BFRC launch application process for A++ Window Energy Ratings

  • 1 Jun 2015

BFRC follows the 10 point band cut offs illustrated in section 4.2 of Approved Document L1b. The A++ rating will follow the same procedure, with ratings starting at an energy index value equal to or greater than 20. This means any BFRC A+ rated product which achieves 20 or more can be upgraded to an A++ for an administration and verification fee of £100 (ex VAT).

British Fenestration Rating Council is the UK authority for independently verified ratings of energy efficient windows and doors.

The new A++ licences are available as Simplified Energy Licences (SELs) and Detailed Energy Licences (DELs). Manufacturers can also apply for new A++ licences through BFRC or an Independent Agency.

BFRC managing director Chris Mayne, commented: “The launch of the BFRC A++ ratings band – the first in the country – reinforces the message that BFRC is driving technological developments that give homeowners the latest and best in energy efficient windows.”

“And contrary to some ill-informed comment within the industry A++ rated windows will not cause homes to overheat.”

The Overheating Misconception

Overheating in domestic environments happens when the internal room temperature becomes higher than the comfort level, and cannot be reduced by simply opening the windows. It can be caused by two factors:-

The first is high external ambient temperatures, which can lead to high internal ambient temperatures due to heat conduction through the building envelope (including, but not limited to, windows).

A++ (and A+) windows have significantly lower U values than lower rated windows, and will therefore reduce the amount of heat being transferred into the home from outside.

With existing glass coating technology, there is a hard physical upper limit to solar gain performance that cannot be exceeded. Therefore, the only way to achieve higher ratings bands is through lower U values.

The second cause of overheating is excessive solar gain – particularly on south facing elevations.

It is expected that all A++ windows (and about 70% of A+) use triple glazing, with two panes of low-e coated glass. Their solar gain factor is significantly lower than the equivalent double glazed window.

So all BFRC A++ rated windows (and the majority of A+) will actually help to reduce overheating during the summer months. In the winter they will help keep the home much warmer.

British Fenestration Rating Council (BFRC),
54 Ayres Street,
London,
United Kingdom,
SE1 1EU

Phone: 020 7403 9200

Visit BFRC's website

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